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3.2.9 Parched Corn And Bean




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This article is from the Food Preserving FAQ, by Eric Decker ericnospam@getcomputing.com with numerous contributions by others.

3.2.9 Parched Corn And Bean

from David Sidwell (pre-1996)

Here is a wonderful recipe for parched corn. it is eaten by Hopi
children and adults as a real treat. Speaking of parched corn, you can
also parch beans. Small, white teparies work well, especially if they
are from last year's harvest or older. The Hopi make parched beans the
same way they make parched corn.

1. Heat clean, fine sand in a cast iron pot until it becomes dark brown
and hot. (water sprinkled on it should pop and sizzle).

2. pour in a cup or two of dried corn. (old corn will be crunchy, this
year's corn will be harder).

3. Stir corn briskly, to keep it from burning, until it stops popping.

4. Remove corn from sand with a sieve and pour into bowl.

5. Sprinkle corn with salt water (1 T. salt in 1 C. water), and stir with
a corn cob that has been dipped in the salt water.

6. Add pinon or peach nuts for variety.

Note: The Hopi nation has very sandy soil. it does not cling like many
sands but falls away from toasted foods. You may want to
experiment a bit with the sand from your area.
We put parched corn in stews, soups, salads, and we eat it plain. yum
yum. Parched beans are often used as a snack.

 

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