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3.2.7.1 Dehydrating Beef Sticks




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This article is from the Food Preserving FAQ, by Eric Decker ericnospam@getcomputing.com with numerous contributions by others.

3.2.7.1 Dehydrating Beef Sticks

From: paulhinr@nando.net (Paul Hinrichs)

Try this proven recipe:

Slim Jims (10 pound recipe)

2 level tsp. Prague Powder #1
4 tbsp. paprika
6 tbsp. ground mustard
1 tsp. ground black pepper
1 tsp. ground white pepper
1 tsp. ground celery
1 tbsp. mace
1 tsp. granulated garlic
3 1/2 ozs. kosher salt
1 1/2 ozs. powdered dextrose
6 ozs. Fermento
10 pounds lean ground beef

This is the Kutas recipe. The last two ingredients are for fermentation
and may be omitted if you don't want the tang. After you stuff the beef
sticks, he recommends smoking at 90-110 F for 8 hours and letting it go
at this temperature for another 12 if you want the tang to fully develop.
Then you raise the smokehouse temperature until the meat reaches 145 F
internally.

If you wish to modify your current recipe for the dehydrator, or use this
one (I highly recommend it, I've made it several times), just follow the
temperature guidelines. IOW, keep the temperature under 110F for 8 to 20
hours, then crank it up to cook the sausage at the very end. What you've
probably been doing is following the same procedure as for jerky, dry at
145 F until dry, and have been ending up with jerky in a casing. Beef
sticks will not be as dry as jerky, hence the lower temperature. FWIW,
I use the Prague Powder #1 and make jerky at 120F and it is much more
flavorful than the stuff dried at 145F like most recipes call for. Under
140F, the curing powder is absolutely necessary to prevent the growth of
botulism.

 

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