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3.2.6 Dehydrating Dried Cranberries




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This article is from the Food Preserving FAQ, by Eric Decker ericnospam@getcomputing.com with numerous contributions by others.

3.2.6 Dehydrating Dried Cranberries

from Marie Martinek (Dec 14, 1995)

I tried drying cranberries in the Excalibur, and even with poking
every single one of them with a serious hole-maker (the sticker that
comes with the meat thermometer) and soaking them in a sugar solution,
they still came out sour and still not dry after twice as long a time
as the instructions said. I, however, tried making cranberry sauce,
whirred it through a blender/food processor, and made fruit leather
with it. Worked quite well. Cover your dryer frames with waxed paper
and pour the goop on (making sure it is higher on the edges than in
the middle), dry until it looks right (I do not have the timing
instructions here), then cut it into strips, peel the paper off the
fruit (works better than trying to peel fruit off paper), curl them
up, and dry some more.

from Phil Rozanski (Jan 2, 1996)

According to "Mary Bell's Complete Dehydrator Cookbook" you can
dry blanched (checked) cranberries in the following manner:

1. In a bowl, pour boiling water over the cranberries or submerge them
in a pot of boiling water with the heat turned off. Let them sit in the
water until the skin pops. Do not let the berries boil or the flesh
will turn mushy. Drain.

2. If desired, coat the berries with either a light corn syrup or
granulated sugar.

3. Transfer the berries to a cooking sheet and place them in a freezer
for 2 hours. Freezing the berries helps in breaking down the cell
structure promoting faster drying.

4. Put the berries on a mesh sheet in the dehydrator and dry for 10 to
16 hours, depending on the make of the dehydrator, until chewy and with
no pockets of moisture.

I really recommend the book that I mentioned above. It contains recipes
for anything you could ever think of dehydrating. I purchased my copy at
Yonkers.

 

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