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2.1.9 Mushroom duxelles. What's the best way to preserve mushrooms?




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This article is from the Food Preserving FAQ, by Eric Decker ericnospam@getcomputing.com with numerous contributions by others.

2.1.9 Mushroom duxelles. What's the best way to preserve mushrooms?


From: Longhair

paulhinr@nando.net (Paul Hinrichs) wrote:

The local grocery had some portabellos marked down yesterday and I threw
a whole slew of them into my smoker along with the leg of lamb I was smoking
at about 130 F. After about 4 hours they were completely dried and smoked
and tasted delicious even dry. I suppose you could do the same without
smoke in a dehydrator or in the oven.

From: jpdion@odyssee.net (Jean-Pierre Dion)

I agree, but personally I prefer a duxelle.

Steps:

1. Chop your mushrooms as small as possible, a robot does a nice job.

2. Saute the mushrooms in oil or butter (to taste) at low to medium heat.
The purpose is remove as much water as possible. They'll shrink and get
a concentrated mushroom taste.

3. Cool. Pack tight and freeze. Yes, I wrote freeze. A duxelle is the only
way you can freeze mushrooms. Use for soups or sauces. Remember,
they will taste much more than ordinary mushrooms.

From: edecker@inforamp.net (Eric Decker)

Larousse Gastronomique '76 says, and I paraphrase:

1. Chop mushrooms coarsely, put in a bag, express as much moisture as
possible by applying a twisting motion to the bag.

2. Saute mushrooms in oil and butter with chopped onion, chopped shallots,
salt, pepper, nutmeg, moistened with white wine, with chopped parsley
added.

3. Stir over a lively flame so that any surplus moisture in the mushrooms
is evaporated - to the degree of a thorough cooking.

4. Allow the duxelles to get quite cold - store in a cold place.

Freezing is quite a good option for a large amount of Duxelles. One could
add a splash, just a splash, of just about any good brandy instead of white
wine. Less is more here. Beware of liqueurs, they will caramelize the
duxelles' subtle flavours.

 

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