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10.3 Devonshire Clotted Cream




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This article is from the Food Preserving FAQ, by Eric Decker ericnospam@getcomputing.com with numerous contributions by others.

10.3 Devonshire Clotted Cream

From: James Harvey
How to make homemade Devonshire Cream

Devonshire cream is just another name for clotted cream (or perhaps just for
clotted cream made in Devonshire?) Clotted cream is the richest form of
cream at 55% butterfat by weight. A traditional way to eat it is loaded on
scones already spread with fresh butter, and topped with blackcurrant jam.
Here are two basic methods of making it:

***** Clotted cream, traditional method *****
Put the cream in an earthenware or enameled bowl, or a stainless steel milk
pan. Heat gently over very low heat or in a basin of water for up to six
hours until the cream has a rich wrinkled crusty look. You must never let
it boil. Set the pan to cool overnight (in the refrigerator is OK but ob-
viously not traditional :) In the morning, lift off the clout that has
formed and store in jars or lidded pots in the refrigerator.

***** Clotted cream, quick method *****
This method requires a bain marie or double boiler, and a thermometer. Heat
the cream until it reaches a temperature of 170 to 180 degrees Fahrenheit
(76 to 82 degrees Centigrade). Stir it once to distribute the heat. Keep
the cream at this temperature (not more than 190 degrees Fahrenheit or 87
degrees Centigrade) for an hour until it looks wrinkled and crusty. Cool
quickly by standing in a bowl of cold water, then set the pan in the refrig-
erator overnight. In the morning lift off the clot that has formed and store
in jars or lidded pots in the refrigerator. I have used the second recipe,
starting with U.S. light cream (equivalent to British single cream, about
18% butterfat by weight) with good results. Of course, results using com-
mercial cream will not be able to match the best products of particular
farms.
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